Sun Dogs and Yellowcake goes ‘down under’

I am pleased to share another review, this one from the other side of the world! The AusIMM Minerals Institute (that’s Aussie, folks) published a review in their August Bulletin Magazine. The following is an excerpt – the full review can be read here.

“…the author paints a vivid picture of daily life [in the small uranium mining town called Gunnar]. The resulting story of a strong and vibrant community spirit in the face of adversity and isolation has universal appeal and will certainly resonate with anyone who has lived in similar mining towns.” The reviewer goes on to comment on the two international book awards received for the book and its shortlisting for two others, and continues: “In this reviewer’s opinion, these awards are well-deserved.”

Curling helped us survive the long winters

For other reviews of Sun Dogs and Yellowcake, see the “Grab Samples” in the side bar as well as The Ormsby review here.

Presentation: Scandinavian contribution to early Canadian mining

Scandinavian contribution to early Canadian mining

Patricia will give a lunchtime speech at the Association for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies Conference (AASSC) on May 30, 2017. Her talk will centre on the contribution of Scandinavians to the discovery and development of mines in western Canada from the 1930s through the 1950s. In particular, she will draw on research that she conducted while writing her book Sun Dogs and Yellowcake, a book that weaves personal stories of people in an isolated northern mining town into the history of Canada’s production of uranium for World War II and the Cold War.

The AASSC Conference will be held from May 28 to 31, 2017 at Congress 2017, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario

Please check back on this site for information regarding the time and place and other details regarding Patricia’s talk.

Don’s tenthouse in background. Photo courtesy Ollie Sandberg

Discussion and Reading, White Rock Library

Join Patricia and other authors for a reading and discussion of their books.

Join Patricia and other authors in the White Rock Library for an afternoon of reading and discussion of the books they have written. Questions are welcome and attendees will have the opportunity to talk to the authors after the presentations.

Patricia will talk about her book Sun Dogs and Yellowcake, a book that weaves personal stories of people in an isolated northern mining town into the history of Canada’s production of uranium for World War II and the Cold War.

Dressed in our Sunday best. Copyright Sandberg family

New Voices Reading, Vancouver Public Library

Join Patricia and other authors for a reading and discussion of their books at Vancouver Public Library.

Join Patricia and other authors -Jerome Baco, Carson Du, Patricia Donahue and Rena Graham – in the Vancouver Public Library for a fun evening of reading and discussion of the books they have written.

Patricia will talk about her book Sun Dogs and Yellowcake, a book that weaves personal stories of people in an isolated northern mining town into the history of Canada’s production of uranium for World War II and the Cold War.

Questions are welcome and attendees will have the opportunity to talk to the authors after the presentations. The address is 350 W. Georgia St. and the presentations will be in the Alma VanDusen & Peter Kaye Room on the Lower Level.

Trespassers may be prosecuted

Christmas Dinner 1959

As a new year dawns, the past is overtaking me. 2015 has been dedicated to shaking loose the collective memories of former residents of a small uranium mining town on Lake Athabasca. To collecting a wealth of photographs of life in the 1950s and ’60s in the town. To extensive research on how the town, Gunnar Mines, Saskatchewan, came to be and how it ended.

Now, as 2016 comes to life, so too does Gunnar. 2016 will be the year that my book on Gunnar is published.

Writing the book has been a journey back in time to my youth, a simple and idyllic life in the North. It has been a way to ‘resurrect’ my home town that closed a short ten years after it started and to reconnect with people after more than fifty years. It has also been a sad reckoning as Gunnar’s Cold War legacy for future generations hits the headlines.

In the spirit of the season, I post a photo taken in our kitchen at Gunnar  in 1959 where my mother Barb Sandberg is making the gravy while her good friend Marge Braund works at the other counter. Friendship.

Stay tuned…