Tellers of Short Tales: a reading by Patricia Sandberg

Patricia Sandberg will read her short story “Paint him a wink” at the Tellers of Short Tales open mic event November 2, 2017 in New Westminster BC

This time, I will be a teller of a short tale. I won’t be reading from my book Sun Dogs and Yellowcake but instead from a new short fiction piece! I am very excited to be able to share my story Paint him a wink. I hope you can join me!

Thanks to the Royal City Literary Arts Society for the invitation!

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Cancelled: Presentation at Mennonite Heritage Museum

Patricia Sandberg research presentation October 28 at Writers’ Conference, Mennonite Heritage Museum, Abbotsford

Sorry to say the organizers have had to cancel this event. They do plan to hold it at another time, so please check back!

I am so pleased to have been asked to present at  a writers’ conference October 27-28, hosted by Judson Lake House Publishers and the Mennonite Heritage Museum. Highlighting the event is renowned Canadian author Rudy Wiebe whose presentation is Re-Membering Ourselves: Every Life is a Story.

I will deliver a seminar from 9:15 to 10:30 a.m. on the 28th about conducting research for a historical piece, drawing on the experience of writing Sun Dogs and Yellowcake. I will also be participating in a panel from 10:45 to 12:00 a.m. Editing and Publishing Your Story.

But this is not just about me! There are several other authors presenting on such topics as “unravelling the Mystery,” Illustration, Fiction and Short Story Writing, Memoirs and Histories, Theatre and Poetry. A number of writers will be reading from their works.

The pain and gain of the traditional and independent publishing routes

Very pleased to share the stage in Kelowna with my husband Bob Mackay – a two-time award-winning author – we will talk about our books and the independent and traditional publishing routes.

Free and all welcome!

West Kelowna Library 2pm-4pm
#31 Hwy 97 S Westridge Mall
2484 Main St, West Kelowna, BC V4T2G2

We’d love to see you there!

 

Whistler Writers Festival

The Whistler Writers Festival promises to be a whirlwind of literary enthusiasm. Some of Canada’s best-loved authors will tempt us with their stories and share their insights. At the Saturday lunch, authors with a penchant for crime (between the covers only), will share dark secrets.

As special features, some authors will have dates with publishers in hope that a golden ring will soon follow. And the highlight for some, on … drum roll … Friday the 13th, will be the announcement of the winners of the Whistler Independent Book Awards. Sun Dogs is one of the finalists!

Venues are the Maury Young Arts Centre, Fairmont Chateau Whistler, and Whistler Public Library. For more information, click here.

Whistler Writers Festival

I am thrilled to be attending the Whistler Writers Festival from October 12th to 15th. It promises to be a whirlwind of literary enthusiasm with touches of comedy and music as well as lively cabarets and salons of the literary variety. Some of Canada’s best-loved authors, including David Chariandy, Leanne Dunic, Terry Fallis, Steven Heighton, Helen Humphreys, Grant Lawrence, Suzette Mayr, Sandra Ridley, Mark Leiren-Young, Terry Watada, Barbara Gowdy, Monia Mazigh, Frances Itani, Michael Harris and Lee Maracle will tempt us with their stories and share their insights. At the Saturday lunch, John MacLachlan Gray, Sheena Kamal, Michael Redhill, Alisa Smith and Jenny D. Williams, all authors with a penchant for crime (between the covers only), will share dark secrets. Continue reading “Whistler Writers Festival”

The true story of a Lake Athabasca mining town

View towards the Gunnar headframe

Thanks to Melissa Shaw of the Uranium Investing News for a great interview the other day. She not only perfectly captured the historical and mining background to the development of Gunnar Mines, she included one of my thoughts about mining practices today:

“People who lived in this town appreciated and valued what they did. Granted, there were some risks with uranium that they didn’t realize, but they really valued the life and they appreciated the efforts that the mining company made to make their lives good there. I feel like we have lost that with the fly-in fly-out [model]. We don’t have that appreciation. We don’t have a family connection to a place, and I think we miss out by that,” Sandberg said.

And then, my next view being of course totally biased in this – the importance of story-telling:

“I feel like we could do a much better job in the mining industry of telling our stories. There are so many stories that are untold about mining in Canada. If we’re not telling those stories they’re going to be lost. Not only that, but it is a way of reaching people who are not in the mining business and letting them understand what mining contributes not just to individual people but to our country,” [Sandberg] said.

There are a lot of “Sandberg saids” here. What do you think of these two points? I would love to know.

You can read the whole article here. And of course you can read the whole true story Sun Dogs and Yellowcake by contacting me here.

Sun Dogs and Yellowcake goes ‘down under’

I am pleased to share another review, this one from the other side of the world! The AusIMM Minerals Institute (that’s Aussie, folks) published a review in their August Bulletin Magazine. The following is an excerpt – the full review can be read here.

“…the author paints a vivid picture of daily life [in the small uranium mining town called Gunnar]. The resulting story of a strong and vibrant community spirit in the face of adversity and isolation has universal appeal and will certainly resonate with anyone who has lived in similar mining towns.” The reviewer then refers to the two international book awards received for the book and its shortlisting for two others, and continues: “In this reviewer’s opinion, these awards are well-deserved.” Continue reading “Sun Dogs and Yellowcake goes ‘down under’”

Canadian Authors Literary Awards for 2017

The Canadian Authors Association (CAA) is a national organization which since 1921 has been dedicated to promoting writers across Canada and to encouraging works of literary and artistic merit. It provides a wide variety of programs, services and resources, and advocacy on behalf of writers. Its annual CanWrite Conference offers authors the opportunity to learn from one another and from experts in the field.

One outstanding service the CAA provides is its Literary Awards which not only recognize a writer’s craft but also provide much-valued recognition and publicity.

On June 24th, CAA announced the 2017 winners:

Fiction: Alissa York for The Naturalist (Randomhouse Canada)
Nominees: Gail Anderson-Dargatz for The Spawning Grounds (Alfred A. Knopf Canada); Madeleine Thien for Do Not Say We Have Nothing(PenguinRandomhouse)

Poetry: Johanna Skibsrud for The Description of the World (Wolsak and Wynn)
Nominees: Juliane Okot Bitek for 100 Days (University of Alberta Press); D.S. Stymeist for The Bone Weir (Frontenac House Poetry)

Canadian History: Charlotte Gray for The Promise of Canada (Simon & Schuster Canada)
Nominees: Peter C. Newman for Hostages to Fortune (Simon & Schuster Canada); Jane Urquhart for A Number of Things (HarperCollins Canada)

Emerging Writer: Eva Crocker
Nominees: Richard Kelly Kemick; Maria Toorpakai

Canadian Authors Fred Kerner Award: Margo Wheaton for The Unlit Path Behind the House (Queen’s University Press)
Nominees: Debra Komar for Black River Road (Goose Lane Editions); Patricia Sandberg for Sun Dogs and Yellowcake (Crackingstone Press)

Thanks to Canadian Authors for supporting Canadian writers and for my nomination. Congratulations to the winners and nominees. Thrilled to be in such accomplished company!

Mining History convention, Fairbanks Alaska

On June 21, I am so pleased to have been asked to give a talk about Canada’s history of uranium mining to the Alaska Mining Hall of Fame Foundation museum in Fairbanks.

This will be my first trip to Alaska where I will be attending the Mining History convention and visiting an old school friend from Gunnar again – after many (emphasis on many) years.

Stay tuned for more details on the speaking engagement.

Presentation: Scandinavian contribution to early Canadian mining

Scandinavian contribution to early Canadian mining

Patricia will give a lunchtime speech at the Association for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies Conference (AASSC) on May 30, 2017. Her talk will centre on the contribution of Scandinavians to the discovery and development of mines in western Canada from the 1930s through the 1950s. In particular, she will draw on research that she conducted while writing her book Sun Dogs and Yellowcake, a book that weaves personal stories of people in an isolated northern mining town into the history of Canada’s production of uranium for World War II and the Cold War.

The AASSC Conference will be held from May 28 to 31, 2017 at Congress 2017, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario

Please check back on this site for information regarding the time and place and other details regarding Patricia’s talk.

Don’s tenthouse in background. Photo courtesy Ollie Sandberg